26 June 2008

The Assimilation of The Greenland Norse With Native Peoples


As I have mentioned in other writings, sooner or later some group of scientists will undertake to sample the mtDNA of certain native peoples of southeastern Canada, including the Cree of the Ungava Peninsula of Quebec, and the northeastern United States for Norse genetic markers.
Such a study is the only way to finally put to rest the 1000-year old mystery of what happened to the Greenland Norse settlers.
This effort should concentrate on a cross section of pure blooded members of the Cree, Ojibwa, and Iroquois Indian tribes. I submit that Norse genetic markers will be found in these Indians as they have been found in the male Inuit(Y-chromosome) of Greenland, although none have been found in female Inuit.
The Greenland Norse, Niels Linnerup and Søren Nørby (Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, University of Denmark, Copenhagen, 2002) 107
This work will no doubt continue and extend into other areas of the Canadian Arctic.
Given the tremendous distances involved, the high cost of travel in the Arctic, primitive conditions, and the shortness of the summer season, it seems plausible that DNA studies will prove to be cheaper than archaeological excavations.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

I agree with most of your comments. However one option is clearly overlooked when it comes to the fate of the Norse Greenlanders.

It should be remembered that piracy and slavery were practiced extenively during most of the period in question (year 1000 to 1500).

This STRONG suspision is based on verbal Inuit saga told to the Norwegian/Danish priest Hans Egde visiting Greenland around 1720, documented Icelandic history of pirat-attacs on North Iceland in the same period, stories of Icelandic slaves held in the Bristol area (England, suspisious gegraphical names of Greenland and Newfoundland marked on the first maps, and even a documented effort by the Norwegian King at the time to the King of England, asking for assistance to stop the pirot/slavery - practice.

Furthermore: Vinland was probably located where Norumbega (similar to Norwegian "Norumbygda", meaning the "the northern setlement". is marked on the same maps.

Also remember, it was likly not politically correct during this period of staking national claims, to tell stories of previous european setlers in Northern America.

Best regards

Nils Bakke

Anonymous said...

I agree with most of your comments. However one option is clearly overlooked when it comes to the fate of the Norse Greenlanders.

It should be remembered that piracy and slavery were practiced extenively during most of the period in question (year 1000 to 1500).

This STRONG suspision is based on verbal Inuit saga told to the Norwegian/Danish priest Hans Egde visiting Greenland around 1720, documented Icelandic history of pirat-attacs on North Iceland in the same period, stories of Icelandic slaves held in the Bristol area (England, suspisious gegraphical names of Greenland and Newfoundland marked on the first maps, and even a documented effort by the Norwegian King at the time to the King of England, asking for assistance to stop the pirot/slavery - practice.

Furthermore: Vinland was probably located where Norumbega (similar to Norwegian "Norumbygda", meaning the "the northern setlement". is marked on the same maps.

Also remember, it was likly not politically correct during this period of staking national claims, to tell stories of previous european setlers in Northern America.

Best regards

Nils Bakke

J. A. Hunsinger said...

To Nils Bakke,

Anonymity is always suspect when one offers a comment, as you have. Although I do appreciate your opinion, that is all it is, your opinion. Except to say I disagree with your baseless contentions, I will not comment further for I do not know who and/or what you are.

Thank you,
J. A. Hunsinger